Domestic/Family Violence

Domestic Violence or Family Violence or Intimate Partner Violence  is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship.

This can happen among a variety of family members as well. This type of violence does not discriminate based on age, sex, religion, gender or sexual orientation. It can take the form of physical/emotional/psychological/sexual/economic abuse. There is an underlying power and control behavior by the abuser/perpetrator over the victim.

Things may seem fine and dandy at the beginning of the relationship but the power and controlling behaviors intensify as the relationship grows.

The key thing to note is a victim is NEVER to be blamed and the abuser is solely at fault for their choices to abuse another human being or an animal.

Domestic violence is real and needs to be seen as a public health issue.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 1-800-799-7233.

Take care of yourself!

 

 

 

Social Support Is Critical for Depression Recovery

Every human being wants to belong. This need is so strong that people will do nearly anything to feel like they are part of something. Personal relationships form a safety net around individuals to protect them from too much isolation. Long ago, people who strayed from a group had a much harder time surviving the elements or avoiding starvation. While it’s physically safer now to live a solitary life, emotional isolation can still threaten a person’s mental well-being. Social support is a vital and effective part of depression recovery. It can turn around damaging isolation, affect a person’s life focus, and generate solutions for depression management. Learn more about how this powerful social force can positively effect someone living with depression. Social Connection Curbs Your Sense of Isolation Depression is a selfish, abusive captor. It enjoys nothing more than seeing you all alone, feeling like nobody would miss you if you weren’t around. It magnifies your sense of shame,

Source: Social Support Is Critical for Depression Recovery | Psych Central